Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Part 9

As I type this article I am sitting in a hospital bed recovering from the surgery I had the previous night and spending my second night away from my boys (the only nights I have ever spent away from them).  Luca is 2 ¼ years old and Jonah is almost 11 month

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Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Parts 7 & 8

This summer hasn’t been much of a break for us.  On Christmas Eve Luca (2 years old) developed a full-on fever which lasted for five days.  Twenty four hours after his recovery Jonah (8 months old) came down with the same virus, though his recovery was a little slower.  Throughout their illnesses both of the boys ate barely a thing.  They did, however, breastfeed.  When your precious child looks pale, despondent and vacant, and hasn’t eaten for days, helpless to do much else for them,  you feel so flamin’ grateful that they are still breastfeeding.  Not only are you able to offer them vital fluid and nutrition, you are also able to give them the emotional comfort that breastfeeding provides.  At times like that it makes such perfect sense to still be breastfeeding my two year old.

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Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Part 6

Luca is now 21 months old and Jonah is four months old. Since Jonah’s birth, Luca has been eager to breastfeed very frequently, often foregoing anything that resembles a decent meal for days on end.  Initially this concerned me, but as I explained in my last article, a knowledgeable La Leche League leader put my mind at ease regarding Luca’s poor eating habits.  

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Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Part 5

In the last 'Diary of a Tandem Feeder' blog post I documented my experience of tandem feeding Luca and Jonah during Jonah’s first two weeks of life (Luca is 17 months older than Jonah). This article tells of my tandem feeding journey through the next two months.

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Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Part 3

In the previous two 'Diary of a Tandem Feeder' blog posts I wrote about my experiences of breastfeeding during the first 24 weeks of pregnancy (to view the first post click here). This post covers weeks 25 to 34.

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Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Part 2

In my last ‘Diary of a Tandem Feeder’ blog I wrote about my experiences of breastfeeding whilst pregnant during the first 17 weeks of my pregnancy. This blog is a continuation of the previous one and covers weeks 17 to 25.

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Diary of a Tandem Feeder - Part 1

Back in 2009 I became pregnant with my third child. My daughter, Laura, was seven at that time and my son, Luca, was eight months old. I was still breastfeeding Luca when I became pregnant and hoped that I could continue to breastfeed him for a long time to come (I'd breastfed Laura until she was three).  I began journalling my experiences of breastfeeding whilst pregnant which, later, transitioned to a diary of my tandem feeding journey. 

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Choosing a Midwife - A Guide

Whoever you end up choosing as your midwife, they need to be someone who you feel you will develop a good rapport with and whose philosophy and practice will support you to achieve an holistically positive and safe birth outcome (by 'holistically' I mean relating to the 'whole' of your being - not just physical aspects, but also mental, emotional and spiritual). 

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Delayed Cord Clamping - Why Wait?

It seems my parents were ahead of their time when, in 1976, they asked that their doctor, who was attending my birth, sign an agreement which, amongst other things, stated that my umbilical cord was not to be clamped until it had stopped pulsating. Thankfully he agreed, and was amazed to witness my cord pulsating for 15 minutes before it was clamped and cut (indeed, it was the first time he had ever left a cord intact for more than a brief moment following birth). My wonderful parents had read that leaving the cord intact allows the baby to experience a much more gentle start to breathing. It was argued that when the cord is cut immediately following birth, the baby has to suddenly suck in air, causing pain in their delicate and sensitive virginal airway. By leaving the cord to continue pulsating after the birth, the baby is supplied with oxygen while it gradually learns how to breathe... a much more gentle start to terrestrial life.

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Scanning for Trouble

I was working as a midwife when I found out I was pregnant with my first child. I had no idea how far along my pregnancy was and allowed myself the excuse that, as a midwife, I needed to know when I was due so that I didn't book anyone whose due date was too close to mine. So, off I went to my 'dating scan', excited at the prospect of seeing my little baby on a screen.

The scanning process turned out to be a rather invasive one. Being so early on in my pregnancy the ultrasonographer told me I'd need a trans-vaginal scan - immediately my romantic notions of 'seeing' my unborn child were diminished (this, by the way, was the only 'internal examination' of any sort that I had throughout all three of my pregnancies and births). But the worse was yet to come... My tiny unborn child had no heartbeat. "The size of your baby suggests an age of 5 1/2 weeks, by which time we would usually be seeing a beating heart," the ultrasonographer plainly informed me. "Come back for another scan in 7 -10 days and we'll check for a heartbeat again."

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Abusive Birth - Helping women to recognise it for what it is.

I stood in stunned silence, watching. The obstetrician was sitting between her parted legs, slapping her inner thighs with his hands, and angrily commanding her to “RELAX! RELAX! I can’t do this if you’re going to keep tensing up!"

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Breastfeeding - Let's stop judging and start supporting!

The 'Breast is best' understanding that we are attempting to cultivate in our community is such an important one BUT it needs to be done right... it needs to be done in a manner that supports all women who want to do the best by their babies when it comes to feeding them (which, let's face it, is the vast majority of new mothers). Instead, through our efforts to promote breastfeeding we have inadvertently developed a culture of harsh judgment. 

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